"Embroidery and patterns", 1977, from the series "Needlework". Acrylic paint and ink on wood. 150 x 100 cm.

"Embroidery and patterns", 1977, from the series "Needlework". Acrylic paint and ink on wood. 150 x 100 cm.

"Needlework" series, 1979. Acrylic painting on wood. 150 x 150 cm.

"Needlework" series, 1979. Acrylic painting on wood. 150 x 150 cm.

"Petit point", 1975, from the series "Needlework". Silkscreen, pencil and acrylic paint on wood. 70 x 100 cm.

"Petit point", 1975, from the series "Needlework". Silkscreen, pencil and acrylic paint on wood. 70 x 100 cm.

"Embroidery", 1979, from the series "Needlework". Threads and acrylic paint on canvas. 66 x 49 cm.

"Embroidery", 1979, from the series "Needlework". Threads and acrylic paint on canvas. 66 x 49 cm.

"Needlework 03", 1977, from the series "Needlework". Acrylic paint and collage on wood. 100 x 100 cm.

"Needlework 03", 1977, from the series "Needlework". Acrylic paint and collage on wood. 100 x 100 cm.

Ángela García Codoñer

Spain, 1944.

Lives and works in Valencia, Spain.

In 1985 she obtained her doctorate in Fine Arts at the Faculty of Architecture of the Polytechnic University of Valencia, where she is currently a professor.

Ángela García Codoñer was active in the Spanish neo-figurative movements Equipo Crónica, founded in 1964 by Rafael Solbes (1940-1981) and Manuel Valdés (born in 1942), and Equipo Realidad, which sought to make art more accessible and to question national identity through mass media. Within this framework, the artist’s praxis was aimed at deconstructing the way women were traditionally portrayed in Spanish society.

In the early 1970s, García Codoñer made collages and screen prints using found images, many of which she borrowed from the cultural and political magazine Triunfo (1946-1982).

These works then gave way to acrylic paintings on wood in which the female body is shown truncated and stylised, as in the series Morfologías [Morphologies, 1973]. On occasion she also used collages alongside painted reproductions of bodies in the series Misses (1974-1975). As such, women were portrayed as emancipated from the contemporary mythological filter of advertising or magazines, while still appearing naked and as schematic fragments. In the series Labores [Needlework, 1975-1980], García Codoñer used photographs of embroidery templates and weaving techniques to portray a craft that is often considered as exclusively female.

García Codoñer's work is part of collections such as MNCARS in Madrid and IVAM in Valencia, among others. Her work has been included in international group exhibitions, such as The World Goes Pop at the Tate Modern in London in 2016, as well as in group exhibitions at IVAM and MUSAC in Spain.

Solo exhibitions at Freijo Gallery:
· 2022   Needlework (1974-1980). Ángela García Codoñer

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