"Queen in Check", 2020. HD video. Edition 1 de 3. Duration: 10'

"Queen in Check", 2020. HD video. Edition 1 de 3. Duration: 10'

"Queen in Check" series, 2020. Photography on baryta paper. Variable measures. Edition 1/3.

"Queen in Check" series, 2020. Photography on baryta paper. Variable measures. Edition 1/3.

Queen in Check

Laura Torrado

from September 10, 2020 to October 31, 2020

The exhibition Queen in Check by Laura Torrado, which presents unseen work in different formats (photography, video, performance and installation), seeks to question the power relations and vassalage established in the framework of patriarchal narratives, revolving around the female body and nudity as a political construction and stereotype.

This exhibition makes visible the theories defended by historian and art critic Amelia Jones in relation to Body Art and performance. According to Amelia Jones, body art consists of a set of performative practices that subvert the socio-political effects of late capitalism and post-colonialism in the Western world.

For her, body art is opposed to the Cartesian subject characteristic of modernism, represented through the masculine gender, which transcends its body through thought or creation. Under this Cartesian conception, the subject is complete, stable and integral. In contrast with this Cartesian subject, Amelia Jones presents through what she calls body art the postmodernist individual, fragmented, disintegrated, performative, immersed in his economic, social, cultural and political context, with its respective connotations of sex, race, gender, class, etc. In line with this social understanding of the self, Laura Torrado presents a performative body that is feminine and feminist, and that defies the patriarchal norm, thus supporting a strategic use of body art.

The project presented by Laura Torrado at Freijo Gallery, “does not strive toward a utopian redemption but, rather, places the body/self within the realm of the aesthetic as a political domain,” in which not only the artist, but also the audience participates, inviting us to rethink the ways in which we build the histories of art and the structures and ideals upon which our contemporary society is based, to play a game in which the rules have been subverted, a game in which it is the queen who is in check. [1]



[1] Amelia Jones, Body Art: Performing the Subject (Minneapolis; London: University of Minnesota Press, 1998), p. 13.

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